H2X Global plans major exchange listing

H2X Global is plotting its course to a major exchange listing and is pushing into new markets in a bid to establish itself as a global premium hydrogen vehicle manufacturer. 

The company, which is undertaking a small initial capital raising, is planning to roll out a series of products in the coming months that will show new ways of working with hydrogen and bring clean energy to many different applications in cities.

One of H2X’s products is a light duty (30-75 kilowatts) optimised hydrogen fuel cell hybrid powertrain aimed at drastically reducing the refuelling time, improving efficiency and increasing the driving range of a vehicle.

A hydrogen fuel cell is a device that generates electrical power by a chemical reaction via conversion of fuel (hydrogen) into electricity.

Fuel cells allow a vehicle to be refuelled in a similar way and speed to traditional petrol-run vehicles.

H2X’s initial target market is high-use vehicles for commercial and sharing purposes where the availability of the vehicle is key.

The company says a fuel cell vehicle is more convenient and effective than a battery electric vehicle because it significantly reduces the time a vehicle is off the road for refuelling, which is crucial for commercial vehicles.

Explaining H2X’s approach to market, CEO Brendan Norman said the company worked with hydrogen infrastructure providers to establish ecosystems that were cost effective from the start.

“We look to offer multiple applications of vehicles to make it easy to reach a critical mass in one location,” he said. “This supports not only the refuelling exercise, but also allows us to establish high-quality after sales operations in all locations that our customers will be using hydrogen.

“Hydrogen ecosystems require a minimum volume to hit the market – our products focus on this market.”

H2X is also developing multiple light vehicles using the H2X powertrain system – a common chassis using sophisticated localised and renewable biocomposite materials.

The company has developed a modular power concept that enables the fitting of H2X power systems to existing and new heavy equipment, allowing for faster development of the hydrogen economy.

Hydrogen fuel cells in the spotlight

Hydrogen fuel cells have become a more mainstream focus for those in the industry, given the technology advancements that have enabled fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to refuel more quickly and travel longer distances.

Market researcher Research and Markets predicts the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle market will grow from around $US16bn in 2020 to nearly $US27bn by the end of 2025 at a compound annual growth rate of 11.23%.

Hydrogen technology is attracting significant investment from not only those developing the tech but retail and institutional investors as well.

Case in point is the recent strong investor support Pilot Energy (ASX:PGY) received for its capital raising, which attracted firm commitments from sophisticated, institutional and professional investors totalling $8m.

Pilot recently announced its expansion into the hydrogen and renewables space.

Decades of automotive experience

The team behind H2X has decades of experience in vehicle development, starting with CEO Brendan Norman who has spent nearly 30 years in top management with major car makers predominantly BMW and Audi/Volkswagen.

During his time at Volkswagen Group, including leading Asia Pacific regional strategy saw the growth of the Group in the region grow into 4-digit percentage territory over a 10-year period.

H2X head of design vice president Chris Reitz has 27 years of design experience, including as head of design for, Fiat and Nissan Europe and significant roles with Audi/Volkswagen.

“Our approach on the vehicles is a complete redesign of the concept of how we build it,” Reitz said.

“The production of vehicles can be optimised significantly with clean energy powertrains because of the shape and integration of the powertrains.

“We have exciting developments for efficiency, performance and to a very large extent in terms of use of renewable materials and clean manufacturing process.”

H2X’s Fuel Cell Team has more than 20 years’ experience, several different models of passenger cars, trucks and buses developed for other manufacturers, of which thousands of units have been delivered.

The company’s chief technology officer, Ian Thompson, also has an impressive CV that details a long career working on projects for big names like Tesla, Bentley, Aston Martin, Volvo and Maserati.

“One of our city focused vehicles will have a different hybrid battery solution to a city vehicle, where we are working with more dynamic technologies to maximise retention of Kinetic Energy, which is our focus,” Norman said.

Source: This article has originally published on Stockhead.

Aviation H2 on runway for global green energy take-off

In an industry contributing a significant amount of CO2 to global emissions, green hydrogen-powered aircraft and associated technologies have seen increasing global demand.

Aviation H2 will focus on the rapidly expanding demand for hydrogen applications in the aviation industry.

Owned and funded by Liberty Energy Capital, Aviation H2 aims to create green hydrogen technology solutions to serve aviation applications.

Liberty Energy Capital and its nominees has investments in emerging green businesses including H2X Global, Sweetman Renewables Limited, Port Anthony Renewables Limited, Titan Hydrogen Limited, Infinite Blue Energy and Verdant Earth Technologies.

An Aviation H2 spokesman said as the world turns to green energy, the company is backing state-of-the-art technical solutions that will play a pivotal role in decarbonising the aviation industry.

“Aviation H2’s mission is to empower companies, both domestically and internationally, by leveraging the latest in renewable hydrogen technology, helping the industry transition to a sustainable energy strategy,” he said.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic grounded most planes, commercial flights accounted about 2.5% of global emissions of carbon dioxide.

The spokesman said hydrogen was the fuel of the future and could be used across commercial airlines, defence forces, cargo industry, and freight services.

“Hydrogen is viewed as one of the most viable options for decarbonising the transport industry, which accounts for over one-fifth of global CO2 emissions,” he said.

As net-zero becomes the universal standard among western governments, the spokesman said hydrogen is estimated to grow into a global market worth US$201 billion by 2025.

“Aviation H2 has been founded on a shared vision to harness the power of renewable energy to take the aviation sector — which makes up 2% of global emissions — into industry 5.0.” he said.

While hydrogen is increasingly considered as one of the most promising zero-emissions fuels for future aircraft, there are still many challenges to overcome. Hydrogen has an energy-density-per-unit mass three times higher than traditional jet fuel.

Aeronautical engineers must work out how to bring the weight and cost of hydrogen down, while the best solution for storing the fuel on board also needs to be determined.

Today, liquid hydrogen storage is seen as the best solution with storing hydrogen as compressed gas presenting challenges with aircraft weight and volume requirements.

According to Airbus VP Glenn Llewellyn: “Cost-competitive green hydrogen and cross-industry partnerships are being considered as mandatory to bring zero emission flying to reality.”

Aviation H2 may be just what the industry needs to achieve that reality.

Source: This article has originally appeared on PV Magazine.

Fuel cell pioneer H2X is raising funds ahead of 2022 IPO

Fresh off debuting its first hydrogen fuel cell vehicle for pre-orders, hydrogen pioneer H2X Global is now seeking millions in pre-initial public offering funding.

The company’s Warrego Ute, which combines its unique light duty optimised hydrogen with the chassis of the popular Ford Ranger, has already generated over $50m in pre-order interest.

It has now appointed Barclay Pearce Capital, which was behind the successful pre-IPO raisings for Verdant Earth Technologies and green hydrogen pioneer Infinite Blue Energy, as the lead manager for its multi-million dollar pre-IPO raising.

This comes ahead of its planned IPO and as governments around the world commit billions of dollars in incentives to accelerate the transition to renewable energy and meet their net zero emissions targets.

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have gained significant interest in this environment, offering the potential to provide zero emissions transportation while enjoying quick refuelling, traits that are valuable for commercial vehicles that cannot be off the road for long periods.

H2X noted that recent market research indicates that the global fuel cell market could grow to more than US$14.6 billion by 2027.

H2X fuel cell tech

H2X is keen to capitalise on this interest in fuel cells with its Hydrogen Fuel Cell Hybrid technology, which is designed to drastically reduce refuelling time and increase driving range and hydrogen efficiency.

Its modular platform allows the hybrid energy system and fuel cell to be customised to maximise the efficiency and performance according to the user.

“One of our city focused vehicles will have a different hybrid battery solution to a vehicle, where we are working with more dynamic technologies to maximise retention of kinetic energy, which is our speciality to improve efficiency of the vehicles,” chief executive officer Brendan Norman said.

“H2X works with hydrogen infrastructure providers and forward-thinking industries to establish ecosystems which are cost effective from the start, where we look to offer multiple applications of vehicles to make it easy to reach a critical mass in one location.

“This supports not only the refuelling exercise, but also allows us to establish high-quality after sales operations in all locations that our customers will be using hydrogen.”

The company is currently developing multiple light vehicles using its powertrain system, which will involve a common chassis using sophisticated localised and renewable biocomposite materials and a modular power concept that enables the fitting of H2X power systems to existing and new heavy equipment.

“Our approach on the vehicles is a complete redesign of the concept of how we build it. The production of vehicles can be optimised significantly with clean energy powertrains because of the shape and integration of the powertrains,” head of design vice president Chris Reitz said.

This diverse range of products using a common platform allows H2X to quickly support financially sound business cases for hydrogen rather than battery-electric for commercial vehicles.

This article originally appeared in the Stockhead.

Suite of hydrogen-fuelled vehicles to enter Australian market following Warrego fanfare

Australian startup H2X is banking on bringing automotive manufacturing back to Australia with hydrogen. After its Warrego ute was met with startling fanfare last week, PV magazine Australia caught up with the company’s corporate affairs specialist, Tony Blackie.

It wasn’t just our readers interested in the launch of Australian startup H2X’s Warrego ute – the company clocked $50 million in order requests within four days of its announcement (remember, the ute doesn’t even officially launch until November).

The Warrego was just the first in a suite of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) the company is hoping to bring to market, which includes more light cars all the way through to agricultural vehicles. The company says its 200 orders on the Warrego have come from “several significant energy companies and a number of private buyers” in Australia and abroad, including the Netherlands, Germany, and Malaysia.

“It obviously shows a pretty incredible demand across the board for vehicles of this kind,” H2X corporate affairs specialist, Tony Blackie, told PV magazine Australia.

Based on the Ford Ranger, Blackie said the Warrego was something of a concept car – a demonstration that a hydrogen-powered twin cab ute could work.

It has undeniably drawn attention, though questions do remain around how relevant the technology will be for light vehicles and passenger cars given electric vehicles (EVs) are far more mature, making them cheaper and visible today. There is also the little snag of where to refuel a hydrogen car, seeing as there are currently just four green hydrogen refueling stations in Australia, not all of which (like Toyota’s Melbourne station) are even open to the public.

Another oft-cited catch is the fact you need to generate twice as much electricity to produce hydrogen as if you just straight up charged your car. Such questions don’t seem to phase H2X execs though.

In its suite of new models, Blackie said Australia can expect a number of other light vehicles like small vans to heavier vehicles and eventually tractors.

“Hydrogen fuel cell capabilities cover all motor vehicles,” he said, noting the horizons aren’t just limited to buses. Brendan Norman, the company’s CEO, has a vision for a range of vehicles to be available for a broad spectrum of uses, Blackie said.

In the short term, the company wants to develop close operations with hydrogen fuel capabilities, but in the longer term, it wants to service the agricultural industry. That is, it wants to enter the farm machinery market, with Blackie saying those conversations are already happening.

“And it’s not just vehicles, of course, there’s the generator set,” he added. Mobile hydrogen generators, he added, are also on the cards for H2X.

H2X’s ultimate ambition is to begin producing its own hydrogen fuel cells for its vehicles here in Australia, though the company is yet to start manufacturing on a larger scale.

So Why Hydrogen?

Well, the primary reason is hydrogen vehicles’ only emission is a clean puddle of water. So if you refuel with green hydrogen, that is hydrogen produced with an electrolyzer powered by renewable energy, the car has no carbon emissions. If the car is fuelled with blue or grey hydrogen created using fossil fuels, that’s an entirely different story. But the point is, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the capacity to be super clean – yes, cleaner than purely electric vehicles.

Batteries are predominantly made from pretty toxic chemicals and Australia isn’t particularly good at recycling them, so a lot end up in landfills. Even if we and the rest of the world get better at recycling batteries though, properly reusing the materials they contain, we will still inevitably need to dig up virgin minerals to keep up with demand. Which makes hydrogen as a form of energy storage (fuel) superior in that department.

It remains to be seen whether it’s enough for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles to displace EVs, but Australia is certainly banking big on hydrogen. As of March, Australia’s hydrogen project pipeline was triple the size of the next biggest, which belongs to Germany and the Netherlands.

Many have speculated about why Australia is so infatuated with hydrogen – perhaps it feels like home for our gas-export nation, perhaps it’s the fact hydrogen can rehouse our increasingly obsolete fossil fuels, who knows – but not everyone is persuaded hydrogen is the clean energy panacea it’s marketed as.

Australian-American inventor and entrepreneur Saul Griffith knows the hydrogen landscape “intimately” and is far from convinced. “I’m not at all bullish on hydrogen,” he said at the Clean Energy Council’s Its Electrifying webinar on Tuesday.

The sticking point for him, like many others, is how much energy hydrogen loses. He estimates about 25% is lost during electrolysis, compression loses a further 15%, and that’s before you even think about unloading and using the fuel. “I think Australia has a dangerous addiction to the hydrogen narrative and I think we need to be more realistic,” Griffith said.

To be fair, Australia isn’t alone in its hydrogen excitement. As Blackie explained when I asked about the reason for H2X’s many arms (H2X Australia, H2X global, H2X marine, and counting), he said the company’s operations have moved far quicker in some areas than others. The first cab off the rank? The Netherlands.

Australia can expect the company to launch its new hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle suite over the next 24 months.

This article originally appeared in the pv magazine

$50 million in order requests in 4 days

There’s been unprecedented global demand for H2X’s new Australian developed hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle with $50 million in order requests in just the first 4 days.

Since orders opened to the public on Wednesday last week, over 200 order requests have been received from all over Australia and the world, including Netherlands, Germany and Malaysia.

Among the customers ordering the Warrego Ute are several significant energy companies and a number of private buyers.

Haim Ptasznik is Director of Veida, a provider of Green Energy Solutions and Hardware, and one of the first purchasers of the vehicle. He said: “The Warrego is the vehicle that we believe the community of Green Energy Pioneers have been waiting for, especially with Hydrogen already at parity with diesel kWh for kWh. Not to mention, the problems that EV’s pose to the electrical network with grid congestion and excessive unpredictable demand disappear, with hydrogen as a supply.”

“We work with our clients to create alternative, green energy solutions and the demand for Green Hydrogen in Australia is booming. H2X is enabling us to be the first to integrate Hydrogen Vehicles and their powertrains into our solutions. An Australian Vehicle powered by Green Hydrogen is too good to pass up.”

The Hydrogen Ute, will be unveiled at the global launch on Queensland’s Gold Coast in November 2021. Delivery of the vehicle is slated for April 2022.

The Warrego is the first in a range of uniquely designed and developed fuel cell electric vehicles that will be released by H2X over the next 24 months. H2X’s vehicles are fitted with the revolutionary H2X Powertrain System that is developed with a vision to improve efficiency by maximising Kinetic Energy Usage and offering flexibility for different users dependent upon their needs.

Warrego harnesses hydrogen power and has been designed to meet a growing demand among vehicle owners for efficient, cost effective and sustainable cars, trucks, buses and other forms of transport.

“The pre-orders have exceeded all of our expectations,” said H2X Global CEO Brendan Norman.

“We knew they would be popular but we’ve been blown away by the demand for the Warrego. Orders have literally been coming in from around the world. The word has got out that we’re on to something really special,” he said.

Featuring a 200kW motor system, 66KW and optional 90KW fuel cell systems, and 60-100KW output Energy Storage Systems between Battery and Super Capacitor units, the Warrego has from 500km driving range on a mix of highway and city roads within a quick refueling time of 3-5 minutes.

Even though it’s a world first, H2X already has in place a wide network of support partners in Australia and developing in key locations around the world capable of providing accelerated distribution, servicing, and after sales support.

With the unique H2X Hybrid Fuel Cell System, a vehicle can run on pure hydrogen, which drastically reduces refuelling time and increases driving range and hydrogen efficiency.

H2X’s fuel cell technology is based on decades of experience in vehicle development and is targeted at high use vehicles for commercial and sharing purposes where the availability of the vehicle is key.

H2X is pushing into new markets, with a series of products due for release in the coming months that will show new ways of working with hydrogen and bringing clean energy to many different applications in cities.

With a diverse range of products off a common platform, H2X can quickly support financially sound business cases for hydrogen rather than battery electric for commercial vehicles. BEVs currently have long charging times, limited expected life, and issues with the disposal of lithium batteries.

H2X is a global leader in hydrogen vehicles including utes, motorbikes, trains, delivery vehicles and ships.

The company is preparing for a listing on a major global exchange in late 2021/early 2022 and is currently undertaking capital raising as it works to position itself as a world premium hydrogen vehicle manufacturer.

Customers can reserve their new Warrego Ute now for no upfront cost at https://thehydrogentruck.com/.

This article originally published on EGlobal Travel Media.

$50m in pre-orders highlights strong demand for H2Xs hydrogen ute

What do you get when you mix hydrogen fuel cells with one of Australia’s most beloved vehicles? Try $50m in order requests in just four days.

That’s exactly the response that hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) developer H2X Global received after announcing that it was taking orders for its Australian-designed Warrego ute built on the chassis of the popular Ford Ranger.

Since orders opened to the public mid-last week, the company has already received over 200 order requests from all over Australia and the world, including Netherlands, Germany and Malaysia.

These include several significant energy companies and a number of private buyers.

H2X Global chief executive officer Brendan Norman said the pre-orders have exceeded all of the company’s expectations.

“We knew they would be popular but we’ve been blown away by the demand for the Warrego,” he said.

“Orders have literally been coming in from around the world. The word has got out that we’re on to something really special.”

The company will unveil the Warrego at its global launch on Queensland’s Gold Coast in November 2021 while delivery is expected to start in April 2022.

One of the first purchasers, green energy solutions and hardware provider Veida, noted that with hydrogen offering parity withdiesel on a kWh (kilowatt hour) to kWh basis, the Warrego was the vehicle that green energy pioneers had been waiting for.

“We work with our clients to create alternative, green energy solutions and the demand for green hydrogen in Australia is booming,” Veida director Haim Ptasznik said.

“H2X is enabling us to be the first to integrate hydrogen vehicles and their powertrains into our solutions. An Australian vehicle powered by green hydrogen is too good to pass up.”

Warrego ute

The base model Warrego Ute features a 200kW motor, a 66kW fuel cell and 60kW energy storage systems.

This uses pure hydrogen to deliver a 500km driving range on a mix of highway and city roads while offering quick refuelling times of between three to five minutes.

Options include a 90kW fuel cell and 100kW of energy storage.

Being a ute, the Warrego will be to carry up to 1,000kg in the try and tow up to 2,500kg.

Commercial hydrogen

Hydrogen is increasingly seen as the go to green option for commercial vehicles.

While battery electric vehicles have a substantial head-start in recharging infrastructure and uptake for personal use, the long recharge times and battery weight make them unsuitable for commercial use.

Both the recharge time and weight are addressed by FCEVs, which can be refuelled quickly and are not reliant on large banks of batteries for range (though they may still have secondary batteries for various purposes).

This article originally appeared in the Stockhead.

Sales of H2X’s new hydrogen fuel cell vehicle surpass $50m in four days

H2X Global has seen unprecedented demand for its new hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle, the Warrego Ute, with the company raking in A$50m ($37.2m) in order requests in the first four days.

With demand all around the globe, H2X has revealed that it has received over 200 order requests from countries including Australia, the Netherlands, Germany and Malaysia.

H2X has additionally said that among those ordering the new Warrego Ute are several significant energy companies as well as a number of private buyers.

The Warrego features a 200KW motor system, 66KW and optional 90KW fuel cell systems in addition to a 60KW to 100KW output Energy Storage Systems between battery and super capacitor units.

Another standout feature of the hydrogen vehicle is that has a 500km driving range whilst boasting a refuelling time of between three to five minutes.

The Warrego Ute also utilises the unique H2X hybrid fuel cell system which allows the vehicle to run on pure hydrogen which drastically reduces refuelling times and increases driving range and hydrogen efficiency.

Haim Ptasznik, Director of Veida and one of the first purchasers of the vehicle, said, “The Warrego is the vehicle that we believe the community of green energy pioneers have been waiting for, especially with hydrogen already at parity with diesel kWh for kWh.

Not to mention, the problems that EV’s pose to the electrical network with grid congestion and excessive unpredictable demand disappear, with hydrogen as a supply.

“We work with our clients to create alternative, green energy solutions and the demand for green hydrogen in Australia is booming.

“H2X is enabling us to be the first to integrate hydrogen vehicles and their powertrains into our solutions. An Australian Vehicle powered by green hydrogen is too good to pass up.”

This article originally appeared on H2 View.

Australia’s Warrego hydrogen ute claims $50 million of order requests in just 4 days

Australian hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle start-up H2X Global says it has secured more than 200 orders for its Warrego hydrogen ute worth $50 million from around the globe, in just four days since it opened orders.

Hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) have a long way to go to prove their long-term viability, and their ability to compete with battery electric options, with refuelling infrastructure being one of the biggest barriers.

But it would appear that, even though we are in the early stages of the development of FCEVs, that there are those who see the immediate and near-term value of hydrogen-fuelled vehicles.

The Sydney-based H2X last week announced that it will launch its high-priced Warrego Ute on the Gold Coast in November, ahead of deliveries slated for April, 2022.

That sparked immediate interest, and in the first four days since H2X opened orders last Wednesday, the company says it received more than 200 order requests, worth $50 million if the consumers follow through. The orders came from all over Australia, and from countries such as the Netherlands, Germany, and Malaysia.

“Among the customers ordering the Warrego Ute are several significant energy companies and a number of private buyers,” H2X Global said in its press release, before quoting from one of those same private buyers.

“The Warrego is the vehicle that we believe the community of Green Energy Pioneers have been waiting for, especially with Hydrogen already at parity with diesel kWh for kWh,” said Haim Ptasznik is Director of Veida, a provider of Green Energy Solutions and Hardware, and one of the first purchasers of the vehicle.

“Not to mention, the problems that EV’s pose to the electrical network with grid congestion and excessive unpredictable demand disappear, with hydrogen as a supply.”

The Warrego is the first of a range of hydrogen-fuelled vehicles that H2X is planning to release over the next 24 months.

Featuring a 200kW motor system, 66KW and optional 90KW fuel cell systems, and generating output between 60KW and 100KW, the Warrego has a driving range of 500-kilometres on a mix of highway and city roads, and benefits from quick refuelling times of between 3 to 5 minutes.

“The pre-orders have exceeded all of our expectations,” said H2X Global CEO Brendan Norman.

“We knew they would be popular, but we’ve been blown away by the demand for the Warrego. Orders have literally been coming in from around the world. The word has got out that we’re on to something really special.”

This article originally appeared on The Driven.